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Impossible Vase

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Even with today's most highly advanced technology, we could not create an object like this if we tried.

 

"It's just a vase!" you say. "Archaeologists in Egypt have found literally thousands of them," you say.  Ah, but there is something rather unusual about these 5,000-year-old Egyptian vases. They are made of diorite, one of the planet's hardest minerals. Diorite is so hard it is sometimes used to work granite.

How can it be that pre-dynastic ancient Egyptians were able to fashion hollow vases from blocks of diorite? No one knows.

In his book Lost Technologies of Ancient Egypt, Christopher Dunn theorizes that ancient Egyptians possessed incredible machine tooling technology for the precision cutting of enormous pyramid stones and perfectly-formed statues.  Perhaps similar technology was used to create everyday objects like this diorite vase.

That's one theory.  Another, discussed in The Pyramids: An Enigma Solved by John Davidovits, is that the ancient Egyptians had developed geopolymers, liquid or semi-liquid substances that hardened into synthetic stone.  Could it be that a geopolymer version of diorite was poured into molds to create this vase and thousands of others like it?

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Further Exploration

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Geopolymer Theory - The Pyramids - An En
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